THE THEOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES AND PASTORAL PRINCIPLES WITH THE TABLE OF PRECEDENCE IN TERMS OF CELEBRATION IN THE LITURGICAL YEAR IN THE DOCUMENT ON LITURGICAL YEAR OF 14TH FEBRUARY 1969 BY POPE JOHN PAUL II BY - jerkand

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Friday, 13 April 2018

THE THEOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES AND PASTORAL PRINCIPLES WITH THE TABLE OF PRECEDENCE IN TERMS OF CELEBRATION IN THE LITURGICAL YEAR IN THE DOCUMENT ON LITURGICAL YEAR OF 14TH FEBRUARY 1969 BY POPE JOHN PAUL II BY


INTRODUCTION
This paper presents us the theological principles guiding the liturgical year, pastoral principles and the table of precedence in terms of celebration in the document on Liturgical Year of 14th February 1969 by Pope John Paul II. The span of time, one solar year long compromising fifty-two weeks beginning with the First Sunday of Advent and ending with the Saturday of the 34th week in Ordinary Time. It memorizes the redemptive Mysteries of Christ and their efficacy in sanctifying the Saints, thus inviting all the faithful to honour them and live in a similar spirit. The year is composed of two cycles running simultaneously: (1) the temporal commemorates the Mysteries of Christ; (2) the Sanctoral remembering the Blessed Virgin Mary and the saint, developed from annual celebrations of the local heroes of the faith.

The temporal cycle consists of several seasons, Advent, Christmas, Lent, Easter and Ordinary Time. The Sanctoral cycle is ordinarily arranged by the date of the death of the Saint, celebrated annually, together with several feast of our Lady, all of which are differentiated by various ranks. In this fashion the Church Year consecrated time in two ways of honouring Christ and those who followed Him closely.

THEOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES GUIDING THE LITURGICAL YEAR
         Christ's saving work is celebrated in sacred memory by the Church on fixed days throughout the year. Each week on the day called the Lord's Day the Church commemorates the Lord's resurrection. Once a year at Easter the Church honors this resurrection and passion with the utmost solemnity. In fact through the yearly cycle the Church unfolds the entire mystery of Christ and keeps the anniversaries of the saints. During the different seasons of the liturgical year, the Church, in accord with traditional discipline, carries out the formation of the faithful by means of devotional practices, both interior and exterior, instruction, and works of penance and mercy. By means of the yearly cycle the Church celebrates the whole mystery of Christ, from his incarnation until the day of Pentecost and the expectation of his coming again.

 Easter Triduum
Christ redeemed us all and gave perfect glory to God principally through his paschal mystery: dying he destroyed our death and rising he restored our life. Therefore the Easter Triduum of the passion and resurrection of Christ is the culmination of the entire liturgical year. Holy Week has as its purpose the remembrance of Christ's passion, beginning with His Messianic entrance into Jerusalem. At the chrism Mass on Holy Thursday morning the bishop, concelebrating Mass with his body of priests, blesses the oils and consecrates the chrism. (No: 31)

 Christmas Season:
Next to the yearly celebration of the paschal mystery, the Church holds most sacred the memorial of Christ's birth and early manifestations. This is the purpose of the Christmas season.

  Advent
Advent has a twofold character :As a season to prepare for Christmas when Christ's first coming to us is remembered; as a season when that remembrance directs the mind and heart to await Christ's Second Coming at the end of time. Advent is thus a period for devout and joyful expectation.
Lent as Preparation for the Celebration of Easter
For the Lenten liturgy disposes both Catechumens and the faithful to celebrate the paschal mystery: Catechumens are prepared through the several stages of Christian initiation; the faithful, are reminded of their own baptism and through penitential practices. Lent runs from Ash Wednesday until the Mass of the Lord's Supper exclusive.
Ordinary Time, Solemnities, Feasts, and Memorials: It celebrates the mystery of Christ in yearly cycle; the Church also venerates with a particular love Mary, the Mother of God, and sets before the devotion of the faithful the memory of the martyrs and other saints.

TABLE OF PRECEDENCE IN TERMS OF CELEBRATION
The arrangement for celebrating the liturgical year is governed by the calendar: the General Calendar, for use in the entire Roman Rite, or a particular calendar, for use in a particular Church or in families of religious (No: 48).  In the General Calendar the entire cycle of celebrations is entered: celebrations of the mystery of salvation as found in the Proper of the Seasons, of those Saints having universal significance who must therefore be celebrated by everyone or of Saints who show the universality and continuity of holiness within the People of God.
 Following table of precedence, if several celebrations fall on the same day, the one that holds the highest rank according to the preceding Table of Liturgical Days is observed. But a solemnity impeded by a liturgical day that takes precedence over it should be transferred to the closest day. (No: 61) If the same day were to call for celebration of evening prayer of that day's office and evening prayer I of the following day, evening prayer of the day with the higher rank in the Table of Liturgical Days takes precedence; in cases of equal rank, evening prayer of the actual day takes precedence.
Table of Liturgical Days
1 Easter Triduum of the Lord's passion and resurrection.
2. Christmas, Epiphany, Ascension, and Pentecost. Sundays of Advent, Lent, and the Easter season. Ash Wednesday. Weekdays of Holy Week from Monday to Thursday inclusive. Days within the octave of Easter.
3. Solemnities of the Lord, the Blessed Virgin Mary, and saints listed in the General Calendar. All Souls.
4. Proper Solemnities, namely: (a) Solemnity of the principal patron of the place, that is, the       city or state. (b) Solemnity of the dedication of a particular church and the anniversary. (c) Solemnity of the title, or of the founder, or of the principal patron of a religious order or congregation.
5. Feasts of the Lord in the General Calendar.
6. Sundays of the Christmas season and Sundays in Ordinary Time.
7. Feasts of the Blessed Virgin Mary and of the saints in the General Calendar.
8. Proper feasts, namely: (a) Feast of the principal patron of the diocese. (b) Feast of the anniversary of the dedication of the cathedral. (c) Feast of the principal patron of a region or province, or a country, or of a wider territory. (d) Feast of the title, founder, or principle patron of an order or congregation and of a religious province, without prejudice to the directives in (e) other feasts proper to an individual church. (f) Other feasts listed in the calendar of a diocese or of a religious order or congregation.
9. Weekdays of Advent from 17 December to 24 December inclusive.
10. Obligatory memorials in the General Calendar.
11. Proper obligatory memorials, namely: (a) Memorial of a secondary patron of the place, diocese, region, or province, country or wider territory, or of an order or congregation and of a religious province. (b) Obligatory memorials listed in the calendar of a diocese, or of an order or congregation.
 12. Optional memorials; these may be celebrated even on the days listed in the special manner described by the General Instruction of the Roman Missal and of the Liturgy of the Hours. In the same manner obligatory memorials may be celebrated as optional memorials if they happen to fall on the Lenten weekdays.
13. Weekdays of Advent up to 16 December inclusive. Weekdays of the Christmas season from 2 January until the Saturday after Epiphany. Weekdays of the Easter season from Monday after the octave of Easter until the Saturday before Pentecost inclusive.

THE PASTORAL PRINCIPLE
The drawing up of a particular calendar is to be guided by the following considerations: (a) The Proper of Seasons (that is, the cycle of seasons, solemnities, and feasts that unfold and honor the mystery of redemption during the liturgical year) must be kept intact and retain its rightful preeminence over particular celebrations. (b) Particular celebrations must be coordinated harmoniously with the universal celebrations, with care for the Liturgical Days. Lest particular calendars be enlarged disproportionately, individual saints may have only one feast in the liturgical year. For persuasive pastoral reasons there may be another celebration in the form of an optional memorial marking the transfer or discovery of the bodies of patrons or founders of Churches or of families of religious. (c) Feasts granted by indult may not duplicate other celebrations already contained in the cycle of the mystery of salvation, nor may they be multiplied out of proportion (No: 51).
 Although it is reasonable for each diocese to have its own calendar and propers for the Mass and office, there is no reason why entire provinces, regions, countries, or even larger areas may not have common calendars and propers, prepared with the cooperation of all the parties involved. Proper celebrations should be entered in the calendar as obligatory or optional memorials, unless other provisions have been made for them in the Table of Liturgical Days or there are special historical or pastoral reasons. For the pastoral advantage of the people, it is permissible to observe on the Sundays in Ordinary Time those celebrations that fall during the week and have special appeal to the devotion of the faithful, provided the celebrations take precedence over these Sundays in the Table of Liturgical Days. The Mass for such celebrations may be used at all the Masses at which a congregation is present.
Precedence among liturgical days relative to the celebration is governed solely by the
following table (No: 60). If several celebrations fall on the same day, the one that holds the highest rank according to the preceding Table of Liturgical Days is observed. But a solemnity impeded by a liturgical day that takes precedence over it should be transferred to the closest day.

 CONCLUSION
In the various seasons of the year and in keeping with her traditional discipline, the Church completes the formation of the faith by means of pious practice for soul and body, by instruction, prayer, and works of penance and mercy. Christ's saving work is celebrated in sacred memory by the Church on fixed days throughout the year. Each week on the day called the Lord's Day the Church commemorates the Lord's resurrection. In the General Calendar the entire cycle of celebrations is entered: celebrations of the mystery of salvation as found in the Proper of the Seasons, of those Saints having universal significance who must therefore be celebrated by everyone or of Saints who show the universality and continuity of holiness within the People of God.
 The Liturgy is the "doxological glorification of the Mystery of Faith. One can more easily live it than define it, since it requires at one and the same time both contemplation and action. It is, in short, the worship rendered by the Mystical Body of Christ in the entirety of its Head and members.The Liturgy, in fact, unites us to Christ; whether by means of the celebration is spread through the course of the year.



BIBLIOGRAPHY

The Document on Liturgical Year of 14th February 1969 by Pope John Paul II.

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